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Baskhanov M. K. “U vorot angliiskogo mogushchestva”. [“At the Gates of British Power”: A. E. Snesarev in Turkestan, 1899-1904]

Baskhanov M. K. “U vorot angliiskogo mogushchestva”. [“At the Gates of British Power”: A. E. Snesarev in Turkestan, 1899-1904]
Baskhanov M. K. “U vorot angliiskogo mogushchestva”. [“At the Gates of British Power”: A. E. Snesarev in Turkestan, 1899-1904] Baskhanov M. K. “U vorot angliiskogo mogushchestva”. [“At the Gates of British Power”: A. E. Snesarev in Turkestan, 1899-1904] Baskhanov M. K. “U vorot angliiskogo mogushchestva”. [“At the Gates of British Power”: A. E. Snesarev in Turkestan, 1899-1904] Baskhanov M. K. “U vorot angliiskogo mogushchestva”. [“At the Gates of British Power”: A. E. Snesarev in Turkestan, 1899-1904]
Product Code: 01469
Availability: In Stock
Price: £40.00

Baskhanov M. K. “U vorot angliiskogo mogushchestva”. [“At the Gates of British Power”: A. E. Snesarev in Turkestan, 1899-1904]. St Petersburg, Nestor-Istoriia Publishing, 2015, 1st ed., tall 8vo (24 x 17cm), 326 pp., colour and b/w illus., maps, boards, dust-wrapper. Print run limited to 500 copies only. Main text in Russian, Summary in English. [01469] £40.00

Andrey E. Snesarev (1865–1937) is one of the most vivid figures in the history of Russian military orientology. Snesarev’s lengthy and productive career was tragically cut short during the time of Stalin’s repressions, and for too long his name was excluded from the history of Russian academe. In recent years interest in the life and work of this remarkable man has noticeably increased.

This book sheds particular light on the detail of one of Snesarev’s more important formative academic periods — his service in the Turkestan region. Using rare documents from the state archives of Russia, Great Britain and Uzbekistan, and the private archive of the Snesarev family some little known episodes in Snesarev’s life are revealed- a journey to India, reconnaissance of Tian-Shan and the Pamirs, travels around Turkestan with British military attachés, a trip to London, his relations with Marguerite Leiter, sister to the wife of Lord Curzon, Viceroy of India, and more. The book looks at the way Snesarev became established as a military orientologist, giving a detailed analysis of the main academic works written by him during his time in Turkestan. The book contains important information about the state of Anglo-Russian relations in Central Asia at the start of the twentieth century, about the Russian strategic view of Afghanistan and India, about Russian military intelligence in the countries adjoining the Turkestan military district and about the process, just starting at that time, of establishing greater trust between the Russian and British empires in military and political matters or, to use the political lexicon of the end of the Cold War,“confidence building measures”. Snesarev was one of the most vivid Russians involved in the Great Game in Central Asia, one of the last representatives of the Russian military elite directly involved in Anglo-Russian rivalry just before this historical phenomenon became history. Snesarev’s position was that of an implacable enemy of the British Empire in Central Asia; he staunchly supported the idea that a Russian military campaign against India was inevitable, though he declared that a Russian occupation of that country was impossible.